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Mr. Ockham

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Talk1
This information was revealed in part through the alternate reality game
Find 815
Find815 3
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Characters:   Sam Thomas · Sonya · Tracey R · Sam's mother · Mr. Ockham · Oscar Talbot · Other...
Companies: Oceanic Airlines · The Maxwell Group · Austral Air
Locations: Sunda Trench · Black Rock


Mr. Ockham
 
 
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Salvage Boat Captain
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Mr. Ockham is the captain of the Christiane I in the storyline of the alternate reality game Find 815. He is decribed by Sam Thomas as a crusty ol' sea dog and a straight talker. (Find 815 clues/January 8)

When Sam Thomas approached him about joining the expedition to the Sunda Trench, Ockham told him that the ship was crewed up. However, after Sam fixed the broken chart plotter, Ockham let him stay. When Oscar Talbot was questioning Sam's motivations for being on the ship, Ockham told Talbot that they needed him aboard, as the destination might prove hazardous to the electrical equipment.

Trivia

  • William of Ockham is the name of the English philosopher after whom "Ockham's razor" (also sometimes spelled as "Occam's Razor") became known. More properly known as the Principle of Plurality or the Law of Parsimony, Occam's razor states that "entities should not be multiplied beyond necessity." It suggests that when one is trying to find a solution to any problem (mathematic, scientific, philosophic, etc...), when all known variables are considered, the simplest explanation is most likely to be the correct one.
    • Although the principle is often attributed to William of Ockham, it can be traced back at least as far as Aristotle.

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